Counselling

Counselling

What is counselling or talking treatment?

Counselling or Talking treatments provide a regular time and space for you to talk about your troubles and explore difficult feelings with a trained professional. This can help you to deal with specific problems, cope with a crisis, improve your relationships or develop better ways of living.

The purpose of talking treatments is not usually to give advice, but to help you understand your feelings and behavior better and if you want to, to change your behavior or the way you think about things.

You should expect your therapist to be respectful, dependable and to provide an environment that is confidential and free from intrusion. Your therapist will do all they can to be consistent by keeping appointments.

Sessions usually take place once a week and by making this regular commitment it gives you a better chance of finding out why you are having difficulties. The sessions are typically run over an eight week period.

Are you a qualified or student counsellor?

For more information on counselling for Mind see here.

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What do we mean by "talking treatments"?

You may hear the terms ‘talking treatment’ or ‘talking therapy’ or ‘psychological therapy’. These terms have the same meaning and cover treatments that you may know as:

Psychotherapy
Counselling
Therapy

Some people may choose one of the terms; psychotherapy, counselling or therapy to describe a particular talking treatment. This can be confusing as others may use another one of these terms to describe the same talking treatment.

We use the terms ‘talking treatment’ and ‘therapy’ in this booklet, and not ‘counselling’ or ‘psychotherapy’ – although this is essentially what we are describing.

Therapy can be practiced by different types of specially trained mental health professional. In this booklet, we use the words ‘therapist’ and ‘practitioner’ to describe the mental health professionals who provide each therapy. A therapist may be a:

Counsellor
Psychotherapist
Psychologist
Psychiatrist

Merthyr and the Valleys Mind will only provide you with a ‘Counsellor’, access to other therapists may be available through your GP or Primary Mental Health Team’s who are attached to your GP Practice.

How we can help you?

Talking treatments can help with difficult experiences or feelings you’ve been going through such as:

the breakdown of a relationship
bereavement
redundancy
low self-esteem
anger
fear
sadness
guilt

They can also help with common mental disorders such as:

depression
anxiety

Some disorders may require more specialist treatment, for example:

phobias
obsessive compulsive disorder
post-traumatic stress disorder
eating disorders
psychotic disorders e.g. schizophrenia or bipolar disorder
personality disorders

Talking treatments can also help you cope or come to terms with the symptoms of mental distress or an on going physical problem, illness or disability.

CBT and is it right for you?

Types of Talking Treatments

Talking treatments can help with difficult experiences or feelings you’ve been going through.

They can also help with common mental disorders such as:

depression
anxiety

Some disorders may require more specialist treatment, for example:

phobias
obsessive compulsive disorder
post-traumatic stress disorder
eating disorders
personality disorders
psychotic disorders e.g. schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

Talking treatments can also help you cope or come to terms with the symptoms and mental distress of an on going physical problem, illness or disability.

What are the different types of talking treatments?

There are several types of talking treatment and each has its own theory of human development and its own way of working. Some therapists prefer to use one type over another.

You may also hear the terms ‘eclectic’ or ‘integrative’ when a therapist describes how they work. This means that the therapist combines different types of therapy or uses elements from a number of different therapies in their work.

Merthyr and the Valleys Mind uses a range of therapeutic approaches, e.g. Person-Centred Therapy’ in its approach to Talking Treatment.

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So, what is client-centred or person-centred therapy?

This therapy has been recommended for depression, but can also help with other issues.

Client-centred therapy is based on the principle that the therapist provides three ‘core conditions’ that are, in themselves, therapeutic. These are:

empathy (the ability to imagine oneself in another person’s position)
unconditional positive regard (warm, positive feelings, regardless of their client’s behaviour)
congruence (honesty and openness)

The theory suggests that if these three core conditions are in place, the relationship between you and your therapist will help to you to feel differently about yourself and your life. This can then help you to make changes in your life, if you decide you want to do so.

Other talking treatments can include:

Cognitive analytic therapy (CAT)
Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT)
Dynamic interpersonal therapy (DIT)
Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR)
Existential therapy
Gestalt therapy
Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT)
Personal construct therapy
Psychoanalysis
Psychodynamic therapy
Transactional analysis therapy (TA)
Transpersonal therapy
Rational-emotive behavioural therapy (REBT)